Connect with us

Business

Wegeiwor A Gospel Singer Par Excellence

As the world’s celebration of women continue to help younger women aspire to be more than what their cultural settings have confined them to, it is always exhilarating to encounter a woman who has broken barriers to reach heights a lot of us can only dream about.

Published

on

Wegeiwor
Photo: Shutterstock

“Living with different people almost all the time, always having to fight and do something out of the ordinary to be noticed, constant abuse and neglect from family relations have shaped my personality and created within me a strong and burning desire to right those wrongs in any capacity that I possibly can.” Weigewor.

As the world’s celebration of women continue to help younger women aspire to be more than what their cultural settings have confined them to, it is always exhilarating to encounter a woman who has broken barriers to reach heights a lot of us can only dream about.

Weigewor, known in academia as Dr. Patience Aseweh Abor is an enigmatic female conquering academic whilst beautifully lighting up stages with her unique voice and intriguing brand of music.

Even though I’ve admired this young woman from my days at Fountain Gate Chapel Int. in Ofankor, it was not until a few weeks ago that I decided to draw a bit closer and share her story with the world. The aura of positivity and tenacity that emanates from her life on social media intrigued me enough to want to know more and hence this article.

Born on 6th September in Accra, to Mr. Joseph Aseweh Awudanpugie & Madam Margaret Wetia, both natives of Kayoro in the Kasena Nankana District, her first challenge was leaving her parents to stay with her grand mum at Achimota before re-joining her mum and step father in Yapei and later Tamale. This was after her parents divorced.

A key effect of her parents divorce manifested in an inability to get proper parental guidance in pursuing and aiming for any particular heights. Her only resolve was to keep passing every exam she wrote, and for that matter she never thought about a particular career or position in future. With no proper role models to aspire to, she just depended on her God given instincts, wild imaginations and books that served as inspiration to seek a life better than anyone in her immediate environment.

With the above as hindsight you can imagine the turbulence she had to deal with whilst pursuing an adulthood of positivity.

A former pupil of Our Lady of Fatima primary school, in Tamale and Yapei Presby Primary & JSS, both in the Northern Region, Weigewor proceeded to Nungua Senior High School after which she gained admission into Bagabaga Training College, (comma) but her inability to buy the prospectus required to start school on time led to losing the spot. When she arrived late at the school, her place had been given to someone else; despite the tears she shed in a bid to still get admission, her consolation was a spot in the admissions of the following year. This never materialized, as her name was not in the list of admissions for the following year even though she was given the impression that she would make a smooth sail into school because of the previous year’s mix-up.

The above experience frustrated young Weigewor for two years. Somewhere in that state, she found inner strength and boldly applied to Nurses Training College and the University of Ghana. This was an act of faith as she describes it; she simply trusted God for the necessary funds when accepted into either of the schools. Her grades were great enough to get her in any of these institutions. This was however not because her parents were so poor but because they had both gotten married with other children, and each of them seemed to be concentrating on their ‘new families’ and none really paid that much attention to her next level in terms of education. Her mum’s salary as a teacher then could not help much beyond a periodic supply of foodstuffs.

As expected, she gained admission into the University of Ghana to pursue Biological Science and later BSc. Nursing.

Life at the university was the defining moment for her; a well-carved curriculum led her to self-discovery, a situation she attributes to the study of

Behavioral Psychology, Sociology, Biological Foundations of Psychology amongst others.

At this stage of her life she had never been in a relationship so she finally allowed herself to experience love when she met Professor Joshua Y. Abor who conspired with God to open her eyes to love on earth resulting in a marriage and three children.

“It was also at the university that I finally allowed myself to appreciate what was meant by Love and accepted that fact that someone else could love me aside God. So I got married in my 3rd year to the first and only guy I ever dated. So, hey, University was great. Hahhahaha.”

Upon graduation she also successfully pursued the following courses:

  • MTech Environmental Health (Cape Peninsular University of Technology, Cape Town, South Africa)
  • MPhil Health Administration (University of Ghana, Legon, Accra)
  • D. Management (University of Southampton, UK).

She is now a senior lecturer at the Department of Public Administration & Health Services Management, in the University of Ghana Business School.

Apart from having a passion for singing, her first fan was her gandma who loved to listen to Weigewor sing Catholic hymns whenever she returned from work. So when she joined the then Word Miracle Chapel Int. now known as Perez Chapel in Yapei and Tamale, she volunteered to sing before the Pastor would preach. The response by church members was so encouraging she kept on singing and later composing her own music. She later joined the Miracle Voices Choir when she relocated to Accra for Senior High School & her university education. She has never stopped singing since then.

Wegeiwor is actually a name her maternal grandma gave her due to the frustration surrounding her upbringing. Her grandma asked a proverbial question ‘who has God despised’?  i.e. to say that God does not despise human beings, it is human beings who despise one another. So to honor God for all the blessings, she decided to choose that as her stage name.Along the way, her musical composition began taking shape as she made it about the truth in her journey and experience in the Lord. Irrespective of the rhythm or genre, her lyrics project what she knows and believes as true.

In 2012 She released her first Album, “Oh Jesus” which was well received because of the uniqueness of her brand, and the spiritually uplifting nature of her lyrics and vocals.

Often times we find that the very educated indulge in the arts as a hobby, however she sees music as a part of her being hence time management is of essential importance to her. This ensures she doesn’t compromise her responsibilities as a university lecturer and in her own words;

“By God’s Grace it’s been working so far.”

I can never speak with an achiever from the savanna without asking the all-important question;

“What is the biggest challenge the savanna needs to overcome in the quest to further develop?”

“I think aside quality education to change the mindset of the inhabitants of this area, an Agricultural revolution (equipment and evidence based method) is what would transform the lives and eventually bring up development in the savanna, considering that the major occupation of these people is agriculture and land is not a problem.”Her latest single “Alijanda” is a precursor to the wonderful music she is putting together for her next album, which will be released soon.

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Business

#OnTourWithAwedana : Rocks of Fear – Pikworo Slave Camp (Paga, Ghana)

Published

on

The sight and the overall experience of Pikworo Slave Camp take away all doubts about the veracity and reality of the slave trade in Africa. The presence of empirical evidence in the form of relics is enough to disabuse all doubting minds. Perhaps the cliché, “seeing is believing” should be the emphasis here. 

Pikworo Slave Camp is geographically situated approximately 3 KM West of Paga in the Upper East region of Ghana.  It’s located in a village called ‘Nania’. The camp is one of the few tourist sites in Africa with remarkable routes of historic relevance and is known in history as the hoarding, auctioning, and transmission point of slaves. It acted as a transit camp for the slave trade. Slaves were held hostage in the Pikworo slave camp before being transferred to Salaga in the Northern Region. In short, it acted as an intermediary between slave traders.

Legend has it that, the Pikworo Slave Camp was founded by a brave hunter and farmer. The village (Nania) was then developed into a trading center for the Hausa, Mossi, and Zambrama traders where their exchange activities took place.

The story of the slave trade sound is really gory sometimes. However, coming face to face with the facts of history gives a refreshing feeling of how far we have come as humans in our very existence. It’s sometimes incomprehensible and shocking how the purpose of a fully-fleshed human being could be altered and converted to the extent of being a slave. But the evidence available is more factual than fiction.

Centuries back, the slave trade was a very lucrative business activity and because of its dominant nature, it enriched slave masters and other people of higher ranks in the slave market. Nania became the first stopover and an auction market for slaves captured in surrounding lands as well as those brought from the Sahara. It was situated in a very rocky area hence the name ‘Pikworo’ which means ‘rocks of fear’. The rocky nature of the place largely defined the living conditions of the slaves in the camp. 

Life in the camp could best be described as rude and crude. Unlike the luxuries we enjoy today, slaves captured and sent to Nania had to be tied against trees and rocks to sleep. They ground cereals on rocks. They prepared food on rocks. They ate from holes created on rocks and drank from a nondrying opening in rocks.

They walked barefooted and experienced inhuman treatments as penalties for wrongdoing or non-compliance with directives. For instance, there was a site of the camp dedicated to punishing slaves where they were tied to a rock and made to watch the sun.
Dead slaves were buried in groups in a single hole dug around the camp and covered with a medium-sized rock placed on top of the grave as an epitaph to indicate the site as a burial ground for the dead. 

One interesting aspect about the stopover of slaves at Nania was that, despite the harsh conditions they faced, slaves had the chance of producing music with stones used to hit the rocks in a rhythmic manner, creating a pleasant sound with some of the slaves dancing to the tune. In all it won’t be wrong to say slaves in Pikworo slave camp lived “rocky” lives since almost every aspect of their lives was hinged on rocks.

Visiting the slave camp gives a lot of flashbacks and touching memories to behold-Memories that indicate the actual toil of our forefathers and some of the circumstances they faced and memories that give you insights towards making the world a better place. Until you visit the ‘Pikworo’ slave camp, you’ll always be tempted to liken the storylines of “12 years a slave” to “Tom and Jerry”.The former is a real-life issue and the latter is fiction. Don’t dwell in doubts for the rest of your life. Spare a moment, explore and reconnect with the past: it’s a priceless experience.
—————————————————————————————————–

Story by: Bobi Awedana Herty/thesavannaonline

Continue Reading

Politics

ADAGA OO! ADAGA!!!

When on my bike on bright days like this, just don’t cross my path, lest I run you down.

Published

on

Adaga
Photo: Shutterstock

The sun was meters past the horizon as the day was still toddling but showed good signs of being a very sunny one. A long winding queue snaked its way from the waakye seller’s joint to the edge of the street. The Koko seller across the street had also been swallowed by the crowd of school children that had circled her, screaming on top of their voices to get her attention.

I hated to join long winding queues just to buy a widow’s mite worth of food. Gliding on the back of my not-too-new bicycle, I made a quick U-turn and headed for “makpor” the beans seller’s end. The path leading to the “makpor” was a steep one and required a great deal of experience and a touch of perfect riding skills like mine to go unharmed.

Dexterously using my weight to bring the bike to the middle lane of the busy street, I zoomed past two “trotros” (commercial buses), which were moving at tortoise pace. The wind tore at my ears as I sped on and I loved the flapping sound its impact made in my ears.

When on my bike on bright days like this, just don’t cross my path, lest I run you down.

I was soon at “makpor” and thank goodness, the usual crowd there was absent. I decided to make a quick U-turn and come to perform the “sacred ritual” in the holy sanctuary- “Makpor”

Gracefully, I brought the right paddle to accelerating position, at the same time swinging the steering and adding my weight, the style was called “Cee”, it usually turned the bike 180 degrees and would leave the screeching marks of the rear tyre on the bare floor almost like the letter “C”

The rear tyre spun so fast I lost control and was thrown out of the bike. I found myself sprawled awkwardly on the floor.

A group of children who had witnessed the mighty “humpty-dumpty” fall wouldn’t stifle their laughter. Baring their teeth, they screamed laughter out of the bellies.

Wanting to show them my worth and dexterity with the bicycle I jumped onto the bike again. Holding the steer firmly I paddled swiftly and exerted lifting force to the steer and soon the front tire was up in the air-“Adagga” I maintained the posture for about 7seconds, still trying to impress my little audience, I dropped the front tire and repeated the process, this time I lifted it even higher than before.

The force was too much and the back tyre skidded off and down I went again. I hit my head hard against the bare tarred floor and everything spun before my eyes.

There was an explosive barrage of laughter louder than the June 3 thunder clapping. I lay there wishing I could just disappear into thin air or just sink into the dusty earth.

I lay there with my eyes closed for a very long time and all I could hear was continuous explosive laughter and rhetorical questions.

And that is how come I earned my infamous nickname, “Adaga”

By:  Edwin Abanga

Contact:    [email protected]

Continue Reading

Politics

Africa Cry – Quata dares African leaders to act in Libya slavery.

This has informed the release of “Africa Cry”, a song that details the canker of slavery currently booming in Libya. The slave markets in Libya are selling Black Africans for as low as $400.

Published

on

Africa-Cry-1-1068x890
Photo: Shutterstock

2017 has been a good year for Quata Budukusu, the magnum opus nature of his numerous releases attests to only one thing – SUPREMACY.  Even though his relevance in the game continues to be a matter of controversy, his talent and skill cannot be debated. Having been around since 2004 as a rapper, Quata has perfected his art by dabbling in numerous genres often with a finesse that can only come from a dedication to duty. His forte still remains rap, though he jumps on any genre and owns it.

On the subject of duty, Quata believes music can be used in several ways, from entertainment to education. This has informed the release of “Africa Cry”, a song that details the canker of slavery currently booming in Libya. The slave markets in Libya are selling Black Africans for as low as $400. A situation described by the UN Security Council as “heinous abuses of human rights.”

The situation has been condemned by many, and as a rapper with a conscience it is only proper Quata adds his voice.

The emotion-laden song brings to the fore issues of rape & torture, racism, intra-racial crimes, classism, and the seeming silence of African leaders when ordinary Africans are served anguish in foreign lands as slaves. The “animosity” is “unimaginable”, he says, but the reactions of the West in such situations clearly expose the weakness of African leaders.

Quata is undoubtedly one of the most prolific lyricists of our time. His upcoming 25-track album from a single riddim will definitely send tails wagging. An objective media is the only way major talents like Quata will get their due, until then the talent won’t rest. Will it match the ingenuity employed in the 13-Track “Quantum Riddim”?

2018 is will surely be a magical musical year.

Check out other songs by Quata.

Continue Reading

Trending